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How was a New Stonehenge discovered in Ireland thanks to the British Heatwave?

The recent record-breaking heatwave and drought across the British Isles has led to the discovery of a number of previously unknown sites due to cropmarks that have become evident. Cropmarks are visible differences on the surface of the ground which occur as a result of differential growth caused by archaeological remains under the ground.

Continue reading “How was a New Stonehenge discovered in Ireland thanks to the British Heatwave?”

Book review: Mortal Wounds, The Human Skeleton as Evidence for Conflict in the Past

The author Martin Smith, is the Principal Academic in Forensic & Biological Anthropology in the Department of Archaeology, Anthropology and Forensic Science at Bournemouth University. Prior to becoming an academic he spent 10 years working as a registered nurse in surgery and accident and emergency departments. He is the author of a number of books and book chapters as well as numerous journal articles focusing primarily on the archaeology of human remains.

Continue reading “Book review: Mortal Wounds, The Human Skeleton as Evidence for Conflict in the Past”

First Evidence for Caesar’s Invasion of Britain Discovered

Archaeologists from the University of Leicester have discovered the first evidence for Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain in 54BC. Continue reading “First Evidence for Caesar’s Invasion of Britain Discovered”

1941 – Sinking of the HMS Ark Royal

On This Day – 14 November 1941

The HMS Ark Royal was sunk

Commissioned in November 1938, the HMS Ark Royal was sunk less than three years later  on 14 November 1941 by the German U-81. The HMS Ark Royal was an innovative Royal Navy aircraft carrier serving during WWII, the first on which the flight deck and hangers were an integral part of the hull.

Continue reading “1941 – Sinking of the HMS Ark Royal”

1916 The Battle of Fromelles begins

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19 July

Fromelles was the first major battle fought by Australians on the Western front. Fromelles saw British and Australian troops attack the German lines in a prelude to the battle of the Somme. Continue reading “1916 The Battle of Fromelles begins”

Builders uncover Iron Age village in East Yorkshire

Builders in East Yorkshire have uncovered an ancient settlement dating to 800 BC. Continue reading “Builders uncover Iron Age village in East Yorkshire”

1915 – World War I: The last Australian troops are evacuated from Gallipoli

20 December

The evacuation was the best-executed segment of the entire Allied campaign. Suvla and Anzac  beaches were to be evacuated in late December, the last troops leaving before dawn on this day in 1915. Continue reading “1915 – World War I: The last Australian troops are evacuated from Gallipoli”

1912 – The Piltdown Man

18 December

The Piltdown Man was a palaeoanthropological hoax in which bone fragments were presented as the fossilised remains of a previously unknown early human. Continue reading “1912 – The Piltdown Man”

1755 – The second Eddystone Lighthouse is destroyed by fire

2 December

The Eddystone Lighthouse is on the dangerous Eddystone Rocks, 9 statute miles (14 km) south of Rame Head, England, United Kingdom. While Rame Head is in Cornwall, the rocks are in Devon. Continue reading “1755 – The second Eddystone Lighthouse is destroyed by fire”

Mummification more common and widespread than previously believed.

Archaeologists at the University of Sheffield working with colleagues from the University of Manchester and University College London have discovered that some ancient Briton burials are consistent with a prehistoric mummy from northern Yemen. Continue reading “Mummification more common and widespread than previously believed.”

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