History Bytez

Byte Sized bits of History

Have Australia’s gun law reforms effectively stopped firearm massacres?

Published recently in the Annals of Internal Medicine, scholars at the University of Sydney and Macquarie University used mathematical techniques to test the null hypothesis that the rate of mass shootings in Australia before and after the 1996 law reforms is unchanged.

The National Firearms Agreement, enacted after the Port Arthur massacre in Tasmania in which 35 died and another 23 were seriously injured, saw the destruction of more than a million firearms—perhaps a third of the country’s private gun stock.

Continue reading “Have Australia’s gun law reforms effectively stopped firearm massacres?”


The National Library of Australia invites applications for 2018 Community Heritage Grants. Now in its 25th year, this popular grants program makes available up to $15,000 to community groups to help preserve and manage locally held but nationally significant cultural heritage collections.


Free Resource: Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration

Today’s featured free resource is Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration. edited by Kansa, E. C, Kansa, S. W, & Watrall, E. (2011).

How is the Web transforming the professional practice of archaeology? And as archaeologists accustomed to dealing with “deep time,” how can we best understand the possibilities and limitations of the Web in meeting the specialized needs of professionals in this field? These are among the many questions posed and addressed in Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration, provided by UCLA Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press.

Continue reading “Free Resource: Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration”

Roman Metro Works Uncover a Second Century “Commander’s house”

A domus connected to a dormitory and a barracks built at the time of Emperor Trajan and then modified by Hadrian has been uncovered during the ongoing Metro works in Rome.

Continue reading “Roman Metro Works Uncover a Second Century “Commander’s house””

Bones discovered on a Pacific island belong to Amelia Earhart

The fate of Amelia Earhart, the first woman to fly alone across the Atlantic Ocean, has been a mystery for decades, a new study may answer the question of what happened to her.

Continue reading “Bones discovered on a Pacific island belong to Amelia Earhart”

Book review: Mortal Wounds, The Human Skeleton as Evidence for Conflict in the Past

The author Martin Smith, is the Principal Academic in Forensic & Biological Anthropology in the Department of Archaeology, Anthropology and Forensic Science at Bournemouth University. Prior to becoming an academic he spent 10 years working as a registered nurse in surgery and accident and emergency departments. He is the author of a number of books and book chapters as well as numerous journal articles focusing primarily on the archaeology of human remains.

Continue reading “Book review: Mortal Wounds, The Human Skeleton as Evidence for Conflict in the Past”

First Evidence for Caesar’s Invasion of Britain Discovered

Archaeologists from the University of Leicester have discovered the first evidence for Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain in 54BC. Continue reading “First Evidence for Caesar’s Invasion of Britain Discovered”

Australian wife of UN diplomat accused of looting

Ninety-five-year-old Joan Howard has been dubbed Indiana Joan by some after showing off her artefact collection estimated to be worth over one million dollars to the West Australian newspaper.

Continue reading “Australian wife of UN diplomat accused of looting”

Roman Shipwrecks Discovered

Dr Mostafa Waziri the head of the Supreme Council of Antiquities has reported that archaeologists have uncovered the remains of three Roman shipwrecks discovered in Abu Qir bay, Alexandria Egypt.

Continue reading “Roman Shipwrecks Discovered”

Stolen Egyptian Artefacts found in Cyprus set to be returned.

14 Artefacts including 13 amulets and an alabaster vase are set to be returned to Egypt from Cyprus. Continue reading “Stolen Egyptian Artefacts found in Cyprus set to be returned.”

Romanian police seize over 1,100 artefacts

Romanian police who have been monitoring international and Romanian auction house websites, resulting in the raids of the Artmark auction house and 3 “collectors”.

Continue reading “Romanian police seize over 1,100 artefacts”

Burwood Cemetery

Burwood Cemetery is considered one of the oldest cemeteries in Melbourne, the capital city of Victoria, Australia. Situated 14 kilometres east of the Melbourne centre, Burwood Cemetery dates back to 1857, a time of high demand for land due to the influx of people from the Victorian Gold Rush. The cemetery and the police station were central to the Ballyshanassy settlement area, which was later renamed as Norwood and then again as Burwood in 1879. Continue reading “Burwood Cemetery”

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

On This Day – 26 May 1967

On this day fifty years ago was the release of the Beatles’ eighth studio album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. It would go on to win four Grammy Awards the following year, including Album of the Year and was the first rock album to receive this title. Continue reading “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”

Arkansas Armageddon

An accident in 1980 at a missile launch facility in farmland north of Damascus, Arkansas could have led to the detonation of the 9-megaton nuclear warhead, leading to massive destruction across the state as well as radiation fallout there and in neighbouring states. Continue reading “Arkansas Armageddon”

Blog at

Up ↑