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History Bytez

Byte Sized bits of History

How was a New Stonehenge discovered in Ireland thanks to the British Heatwave?

The recent record-breaking heatwave and drought across the British Isles has led to the discovery of a number of previously unknown sites due to cropmarks that have become evident. Cropmarks are visible differences on the surface of the ground which occur as a result of differential growth caused by archaeological remains under the ground.

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Romania’s History under threat because of a desire for gold

One of the reasons for the conquest of Dacia by the Romans in 106 AD continues to attract foreign interests to Romania even today, the fabled gold of the Rosia Montana region. I had the good fortune to be able to visit Romania in 2004 as part of my PhD research, and I travelled through the Rosia Montana region which is the home to some amazing archaeological sites.

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New discovery at Pompeii reveals more about the skeleton found under a rock

In a new discovery archaeologists have discovered a leather pouch full of coins when removing the skeleton of a man who had been crushed by a huge rock.

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A new excavation site at Pompeii reveals its first victim

The new excavation site at Pompeii (Regio V) has revealed its first victim who was killed in a most dramatic fashion after apparently surviving the initial phases of the eruption of Vesuvius only to be crushed by a huge stone block while fleeing the doomed city.

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Roman Army Fittings Found in Poland

Fragments of equestrian gear and Roman soldiers’ uniforms have been discovered in north-central Poland.

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Ancient DNA provides new insights into Human Migration and Life in Prehistoric Europe

La Trobe University molecular archaeologists Cristina Valdiosera and Colin Smith, in collaboration with colleagues from Uppsala University in Sweden and several universities across Spain, analysed the remains of 13 people aged 7,250 to 3,500 years old, from the north and south of Spain.

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Free Resource: Pathways to Prismatic Blades A Study in Mesoamerican Obsidian Core-Blade Technology, 2002 Hirth, Kenneth; Andrews, Bradford

The obsidian prismatic blade is one of the sharpest cutting implements ever produced in the prehistoric world.

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Dogs Trained to Sniff Out Ancient Treasures

A pioneering US research programme called “K-9 Artefact Finders” has been set up in response to alarm over cultural heritage trafficking.

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Shipwreck of World War II Shipwreck Discovered

The wreckage of what is believed to be the USS Juneau has been discovered in the South Pacific near the Soloman Islands.

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Online Resource: The Latin Josephus Project

Flavius Josephus (c. 37–100 CE) was a historian who wrote the Antiquities, a history of the Jews up to Roman times, and the Jewish War, describing the Jewish rebellion against the Romans in 66–73 CE, as well as the Against Apion.
 

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Have Australia’s gun law reforms effectively stopped firearm massacres?

Published recently in the Annals of Internal Medicine, scholars at the University of Sydney and Macquarie University used mathematical techniques to test the null hypothesis that the rate of mass shootings in Australia before and after the 1996 law reforms is unchanged.

The National Firearms Agreement, enacted after the Port Arthur massacre in Tasmania in which 35 died and another 23 were seriously injured, saw the destruction of more than a million firearms—perhaps a third of the country’s private gun stock.

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2018 COMMUNITY HERITAGE GRANTS OPEN

The National Library of Australia invites applications for 2018 Community Heritage Grants. Now in its 25th year, this popular grants program makes available up to $15,000 to community groups to help preserve and manage locally held but nationally significant cultural heritage collections.

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Free Resource: Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration

Today’s featured free resource is Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration. edited by Kansa, E. C, Kansa, S. W, & Watrall, E. (2011).

How is the Web transforming the professional practice of archaeology? And as archaeologists accustomed to dealing with “deep time,” how can we best understand the possibilities and limitations of the Web in meeting the specialized needs of professionals in this field? These are among the many questions posed and addressed in Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration, provided by UCLA Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press.

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Roman Metro Works Uncover a Second Century “Commander’s house”

A domus connected to a dormitory and a barracks built at the time of Emperor Trajan and then modified by Hadrian has been uncovered during the ongoing Metro works in Rome.

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