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Weapon

Have Australia’s gun law reforms effectively stopped firearm massacres?

Published recently in the Annals of Internal Medicine, scholars at the University of Sydney and Macquarie University used mathematical techniques to test the null hypothesis that the rate of mass shootings in Australia before and after the 1996 law reforms is unchanged.

The National Firearms Agreement, enacted after the Port Arthur massacre in Tasmania in which 35 died and another 23 were seriously injured, saw the destruction of more than a million firearms—perhaps a third of the country’s private gun stock.

Continue reading “Have Australia’s gun law reforms effectively stopped firearm massacres?”

Book review: Mortal Wounds, The Human Skeleton as Evidence for Conflict in the Past

The author Martin Smith, is the Principal Academic in Forensic & Biological Anthropology in the Department of Archaeology, Anthropology and Forensic Science at Bournemouth University. Prior to becoming an academic he spent 10 years working as a registered nurse in surgery and accident and emergency departments. He is the author of a number of books and book chapters as well as numerous journal articles focusing primarily on the archaeology of human remains.

Continue reading “Book review: Mortal Wounds, The Human Skeleton as Evidence for Conflict in the Past”

Lead Sling bullets that whistle

A recent excavation at what is believed to be the site of the first battle of the Roman invasion of Scotland around 140 AD, has uncovered a number of lead slingshot that contained drilled holes. Continue reading “Lead Sling bullets that whistle”

1942 – The first flight of the Hellcat

26 June

The Grumman F6F Hellcat was an American carrier-based fighter aircraft designed to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat in United States Navy (USN) service.

Continue reading “1942 – The first flight of the Hellcat”

1893 – Lizzie Borden is acquitted of murder

20 June

Lizzie Andrew Borden (19 July, 1860 – 1 June, 1927) was an American woman who gained infamy for being tried and acquitted for the 1892 axe murders of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts.

Continue reading “1893 – Lizzie Borden is acquitted of murder”

Roman terror weapon discovered in Scotland

Evidence Found for Secret Terror Weapon of the Romans

 

A set of lead sling bullets that made a whistling sound when thrown have been discovered by archaeologists in Burnswark Hill in southwestern Scotland. Continue reading “Roman terror weapon discovered in Scotland”

1941 – Bismarck is sunk

27 May

Three days after sinking the British Battlecruiser Hood, the German Battleship Bismarck is pounded to a wreck by the British Battleships King George V and Rodney, forcing the crew of Bismarck to scuttle their ship.

Continue reading “1941 – Bismarck is sunk”

1944 – the first use of helicopters in combat

22 April

The 1st Air Commando Group using Sikorsky R-4 helicopters stage the first use of helicopters in combat with combat search and rescue operations in the China Burma India Theater. Continue reading “1944 – the first use of helicopters in combat”

1968 – James Earl Ray assassinates Martin Luther King Jr.

4 April

James Earl Ray (10 March 1928 – 23 April 1998) was an American convicted of the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. Ray was convicted on his 41st birthday after entering a guilty plea to forgo a jury trial. Had he been found guilty by jury trial, he would have been eligible for the death penalty. He was sentenced to 99 years in prison. He later recanted his confession and tried unsuccessfully to gain access to a retrial. In 1998, Ray died in prison of complications due to chronic hepatitis C infection. Continue reading “1968 – James Earl Ray assassinates Martin Luther King Jr.”

1882 – Jesse James is killed by Robert Ford

3 April

Jesse Woodson James (5 September 1847 – 3 April 1882) was an American outlaw, guerilla, gang leader, bank robber, train robber, and murderer from the state of Missouri and the most famous member of the James-Younger Gang. Jesse and his brother Frank James were Confederate guerrillas or Bushwhackers during the Civil War. They were accused of participating in atrocities committed against Union soldiers, including the Centralia Massacre. After the war, as members of various gangs of outlaws, they robbed banks, stagecoaches, and trains. The James brothers were most active as members of their own gang from about 1866 until 1876, when as a result of their attempted robbery of a bank in Northfield, Minnesota, several members of the gang were captured or killed. They continued in crime for several years, recruiting new members, but were under increasing pressure from law enforcement. Continue reading “1882 – Jesse James is killed by Robert Ford”

1939 – The Heinkel He 100 fighter sets a world airspeed record of 463 mph (745km/h)

30 March

The Heinkel He 100 was a German pre-World War II fighter aircraft design from Heinkel. Although it proved to be one of the fastest fighter aircraft in the world at the time of its development, the design was not ordered into series production. Approximately 19 prototypes and pre-production examples were built. None are known to have survived the war. Continue reading “1939 – The Heinkel He 100 fighter sets a world airspeed record of 463 mph (745km/h)”

1911 – The M1911 .45 ACP pistol becomes the official U.S. Army side arm

29 March

The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated pistol chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge. It served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States Armed Forces from 1911 to 1986. Continue reading “1911 – The M1911 .45 ACP pistol becomes the official U.S. Army side arm”

1922 – The USS Langley is commissioned

20 March

USS Langley (CV-1/AV-3) was the United States Navy’s first aircraft carrier, converted in 1920 from the collier USS Jupiter (AC-3), and also the U.S. Navy’s first turbo-electric-powered ship. Continue reading “1922 – The USS Langley is commissioned”

1947 – First flight of the B-45 Tornado strategic bomber

17 March

The North American B-45 Tornado was the United States Air Force’s (USAF) first operational jet bomber, and the first multi-jet engined bomber in the world to be refuelled in mid-air. The B-45 was an important part of the United States’s nuclear deterrent for several years in the early 1950s, but was soon superseded by the Boeing B-47 Stratojet. B-45s and RB-45s served in the United States Air Force’s Strategic Air Command from 1950 until 1959. It was also the first jet bomber of the NATO Alliance, which was formed in 1949. Continue reading “1947 – First flight of the B-45 Tornado strategic bomber”

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