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Have Australia’s gun law reforms effectively stopped firearm massacres?

Published recently in the Annals of Internal Medicine, scholars at the University of Sydney and Macquarie University used mathematical techniques to test the null hypothesis that the rate of mass shootings in Australia before and after the 1996 law reforms is unchanged.

The National Firearms Agreement, enacted after the Port Arthur massacre in Tasmania in which 35 died and another 23 were seriously injured, saw the destruction of more than a million firearms—perhaps a third of the country’s private gun stock.

Continue reading “Have Australia’s gun law reforms effectively stopped firearm massacres?”

1908 – The ‘birth’of what would become the FBI

26 July

United States Attorney General Charles Joseph Bonaparte issues an order to immediately staff the Office of the Chief Examiner (later renamed the Federal Bureau of Investigation).

Continue reading “1908 – The ‘birth’of what would become the FBI”

1937 – FDR’s court-packing plan

22 July

The Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937 or “court-packing plan” was a legislative initiative proposed by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt to add more justices to the U.S. Supreme Court. Roosevelt’s purpose was to obtain favourable rulings regarding New Deal legislation that the court had ruled unconstitutional. Continue reading “1937 – FDR’s court-packing plan”

1934 – The Night of the Long Knives

30 June

Adolf Hitler’s violent purge of his political rivals in Germany, begins on this day in 1934. Continue reading “1934 – The Night of the Long Knives”

1215 – Magna Carta Libertatum

15 June

On this day in 1215,  King John of England puts his seal to the Magna Carta Libertatum (commonly known as Magna Carta).

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529 – First draft of the Corpus Juris Civilis is issued

7 April

The Corpus Iuris Civilis (“Body of Civil Law”) is the modern name for a collection of fundamental works in jurisprudence, issued from 529 to 534 by order of Justinian I, Eastern Roman Emperor. It is also sometimes referred to as the Code of Justinian, although this name belongs more properly to the part titled Codex Justinianus. Continue reading “529 – First draft of the Corpus Juris Civilis is issued”

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