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1865 – The ‘Sultana’ disaster

27 April

Sultana was a Mississippi River side-wheel steamboat that exploded on this day in 1865. Continue reading “1865 – The ‘Sultana’ disaster”

1986 – The Chernobyl nuclear disaster

26 April

The Chernobyl disaster was a catastrophic nuclear accident that occurred on this day in 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the city of Pripyat, then located in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic of the Soviet Union. Continue reading “1986 – The Chernobyl nuclear disaster”

1944 – the first use of helicopters in combat

22 April

The 1st Air Commando Group using Sikorsky R-4 helicopters stage the first use of helicopters in combat with combat search and rescue operations in the China Burma India Theater. Continue reading “1944 – the first use of helicopters in combat”

1963 – Submarine USS Thresher lost at sea

April

USS Thresher (SSN-593) was the lead boat of her class of nuclear-powered attack submarines in the United States Navy. She was lost with all hands during deep-diving tests on 10 April 1963.

Continue reading “1963 – Submarine USS Thresher lost at sea”

1909 – Construction of the ill fated RMS Titanic begins

31 March

The name Titanic was derived from Greek mythology and meant gigantic. Built in Belfast, Ireland, in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (as it was then known), the RMS Titanic was the second of the three Olympic-class ocean liners—the first was the RMS Olympic and the third was the HMHS Britannic. They were by far the largest vessels of the British shipping company White Star Line’s fleet, which comprised 29 steamers and tenders in 1912. The three ships had their genesis in a discussion in mid-1907 between the White Star Line’s chairman, J. Bruce Ismay, and the American financier J. P. Morgan, who controlled the White Star Line’s parent corporation, the International Mercantile Marine Co. (IMM). Continue reading “1909 – Construction of the ill fated RMS Titanic begins”

1977 – Tenerife airport disaster

27 March

The Tenerife airport disaster was a fatal runway collision between two Boeing 747s on this day in 1977, at Los Rodeos Airport (now Tenerife North Airport) on the Spanish island of Tenerife, one of the Canary Islands. The crash killed 583 people, making it the deadliest accident in aviation history. As a result of the complex interaction of organizational influences, environmental preconditions, and unsafe acts leading up to this aircraft mishap, the disaster at Tenerife has served as a textbook example for reviewing the processes and frameworks used in aviation mishap investigations and accident prevention. Continue reading “1977 – Tenerife airport disaster”

1944 – The eruption of Mount Vesuvius in Italy kills 26 people and causes thousands to flee their homes

18 March

Mount Vesuvius is a stratovolcano in the Gulf of Naples, Italy, about 9 km (5.6 mi) east of Naples and a short distance from the shore. It is one of several volcanoes which form the Campanian volcanic arc. Vesuvius consists of a large cone partially encircled by the steep rim of a summit caldera caused by the collapse of an earlier and originally much higher structure. Continue reading “1944 – The eruption of Mount Vesuvius in Italy kills 26 people and causes thousands to flee their homes”

1961 – U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower delivers a televised farewell address, in which he warns against the accumulation of power by the “military–industrial complex”

17 January

The military–industrial complex, or military–industrial–congressional complex, comprises the policy and monetary relationships which exist between legislators, national armed forces, and the arms industry that supports them. Continue reading “1961 – U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower delivers a televised farewell address, in which he warns against the accumulation of power by the “military–industrial complex””

1862 – Hartley Colliery Disaster

16 January

The Hartley Colliery disaster was a coal mining accident in Northumberland, England that occurred on this day in 1862 and resulted in the deaths of 204 men. The beam of the pit’s pumping engine broke and fell down the shaft, trapping the men below. The disaster prompted a change in UK law that henceforth required all collieries to have at least two independent means of escape.

1847 – Sam Colt’s first major commercial revolver – Colt Walker

The Colt Walker was a single-action revolver with a revolving cylinder holding six charges of black powder behind six bullets (typically .44 caliber lead balls). It was designed in 1847 as a collaboration between Captain Samuel Hamilton Walker and American firearms inventor Samuel Colt. Continue reading “1847 – Sam Colt’s first major commercial revolver – Colt Walker”

1971 – The second Ibrox disaster kills 66 fans at a Rangers-Celtic association football (soccer) match

2 January

The 1971 Ibrox disaster was a crush among the crowd at an Old Firm football game, which led to 66 deaths and more than 200 injuries. It happened on this day in 1971 in an exit stairway at Ibrox Park (now Ibrox Stadium) in Glasgow, Scotland. It was the worst British football disaster until the Hillsborough disaster in Sheffield, England, in 1989. Continue reading “1971 – The second Ibrox disaster kills 66 fans at a Rangers-Celtic association football (soccer) match”

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