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History Bytez

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Politics

1829 – Battle of Tarqui is fought

27 February

The Battle of Tarqui, took place on this day in 1829 at Portete de Tarqui, near Cuenca, Ecuador. It was fought between troops from Gran Colombia, commanded by Antonio José de Sucre, and Peruvian troops under José de La Mar. It was a victory for Gran Colombia. Continue reading “1829 – Battle of Tarqui is fought”

1613 – Michael I is unanimously elected Tsar by a national assembly, beginning the Romanov dynasty of Imperial Russia

21 February

Michael I of Russia became the first Russian Tsar of the house of Romanov after the zemskiy sobor of 1613 elected him to rule the Tsardom of Russia. He was the son of Feodor Nikitich Romanov (later known as Patriarch Filaret) and of Xenia (later known as “the great nun” Martha). He is also a nephew of Feodor I (the last Rurikid Tsar) through his aunt Anastasia Romanovna (his paternal grandfather’s sister) and through marriage with Tsar Ivan IV of Russia. His accession marked the end of the Time of Troubles of 1598-1613.

AD 17 – Messalina, third wife of Emperor Claudius, is born

25 January

Valeria Messalina, (c. 17/20–48) married (as his third wife) the Roman Emperor Claudius. She was a paternal cousin of the Emperor Nero, a second-cousin of the Emperor Caligula, and a great-grandniece of the Emperor Augustus. A powerful and influential woman with a reputation for promiscuity, she allegedly conspired against her husband and was executed on the discovery of the plot. Her notorious reputation arguably results from political bias, but works of art and literature have perpetuated it into modern times.

1971 – Idi Amin leads a coup deposing Milton Obote and becomes Uganda’s president

25 January

Idi Amin Dada (c. 1923-28 – 16 August 2003) was the third President of Uganda, ruling from 1971 to 1979. Continue reading “1971 – Idi Amin leads a coup deposing Milton Obote and becomes Uganda’s president”

1787 – Shays’s Rebellion: The rebellion’s largest confrontation, outside the Springfield Armory

25 January

Shays Rebellion was an armed uprising in Massachusetts (mostly in and around Springfield) during 1786 and 1787. Revolutionary War veteran Daniel Shays led four thousand rebels (called Shaysites) in rising up against perceived economic injustices and suspension of civil rights by Massachusetts, and in a later attempt to capture the United States’ national weapons arsenal at the U.S. Armoury at Springfield. Continue reading “1787 – Shays’s Rebellion: The rebellion’s largest confrontation, outside the Springfield Armory”

1570 – James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray, regent of Scotland, is assassinated by firearm

23 January

James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray (c. 1531 – 23 January 1570) was a member of the House of Stewart as the illegitimate son of King James V, and was Regent of Scotland for his half-nephew, the infant King James VI of Scotland, from 1567 until his assassination in 1570.  Continue reading “1570 – James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray, regent of Scotland, is assassinated by firearm”

1905 – Bloody Sunday in Saint Petersburg, beginning of the 1905 revolution

22 January

Bloody Sunday is the name given to the events of Sunday, 22 January 1905 in St.Petersburg, Russia, when unarmed demonstrators led by Father Georgy Gapon were fired upon by soldiers of the Imperial Guard as they marched towards the Winter Palace to present a petition to Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. Continue reading “1905 – Bloody Sunday in Saint Petersburg, beginning of the 1905 revolution”

1961 – U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower delivers a televised farewell address, in which he warns against the accumulation of power by the “military–industrial complex”

17 January

The military–industrial complex, or military–industrial–congressional complex, comprises the policy and monetary relationships which exist between legislators, national armed forces, and the arms industry that supports them. Continue reading “1961 – U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower delivers a televised farewell address, in which he warns against the accumulation of power by the “military–industrial complex””

1412 – The Medici family is appointed official banker of the Papacy

16 January

The House of Medici was an Italian banking family, political dynasty and later royal house that first began to gather prominence under Cosimo de’ Medici in the Republic of Florence during the late 14th century. The family originated in the Mugello region of the Tuscan countryside, gradually rising until they were able to fund the Medici Bank. The bank was the largest in Europe during the 15th century, seeing the Medici gain political power in Florence — though officially they remained citizens rather than monarchs. Continue reading “1412 – The Medici family is appointed official banker of the Papacy”

1835 – The United States national debt is zero for the only time

8 January

Except for about a year during 1835–1836, the United States has continuously had a fluctuating public debt since the US Constitution legally went into effect on 4 March, 1789. Continue reading “1835 – The United States national debt is zero for the only time”

1920 – The New York State Assembly refuses to seat five duly elected Socialist assemblymen

7 January

The 143rd New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from 7 January to September 1920, during the second year of Al Smith’s governorship, in Albany. At this time there were two major political parties: the Republican Party and the Democratic Party. The Socialist Party also nominated tickets. Continue reading “1920 – The New York State Assembly refuses to seat five duly elected Socialist assemblymen”

1884 – The Fabian Society is founded in London, England, United Kingdom

4 January

The Fabian Society is a British socialist organization whose purpose is to advance the principles of socialism via gradualist and reformist effort in democracies, rather than by revolutionary overthrow. Continue reading “1884 – The Fabian Society is founded in London, England, United Kingdom”

1861 – American Civil War: The Trent Affair

26 December

The Trent Affair was an international diplomatic incident that occurred during the American Civil War. Continue reading “1861 – American Civil War: The Trent Affair”

1984 – Bernhard Goetz shoots four would-be muggers on an express train in Manhattan section of New York, New York

22 December

Bernhard Hugo Goetz is a New York City man known for shooting four young men when they tried to mug him on a New York City Subway train in Manhattan on this day in 1984. Continue reading “1984 – Bernhard Goetz shoots four would-be muggers on an express train in Manhattan section of New York, New York”

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