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History Bytez

Byte Sized bits of History

Month

March 2016

1909 – Construction of the ill fated RMS Titanic begins

31 March

The name Titanic was derived from Greek mythology and meant gigantic. Built in Belfast, Ireland, in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (as it was then known), the RMS Titanic was the second of the three Olympic-class ocean liners—the first was the RMS Olympic and the third was the HMHS Britannic. They were by far the largest vessels of the British shipping company White Star Line’s fleet, which comprised 29 steamers and tenders in 1912. The three ships had their genesis in a discussion in mid-1907 between the White Star Line’s chairman, J. Bruce Ismay, and the American financier J. P. Morgan, who controlled the White Star Line’s parent corporation, the International Mercantile Marine Co. (IMM). Continue reading “1909 – Construction of the ill fated RMS Titanic begins”

1889 – The Eiffel Tower is officially opened

31 March

The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. Constructed in 1889 as the entrance to the 1889 World’s Fair, it was initially criticized by some of France’s leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but has become a global cultural icon of France and one of the most recognisable structures in the world. The tower is the tallest structure in Paris and the most-visited paid monument in the world: 6.98 million people ascended it in 2011. The tower received its 250 millionth visitor in 2010.

Continue reading “1889 – The Eiffel Tower is officially opened”

627 – Battle of the Trench

31 March

The Battle of the Trench was a 27 – day long siege of Yathrib (now Medina) by Arab and Jewish tribes. The strength of the confederate armies is estimated around 10,000 men with six hundred horses and some camels, while the Medinan defenders numbered 3,000. The battle coincided with harsh winter weather of January/February 627. Continue reading “627 – Battle of the Trench”

1964 – Jeopardy!, hosted by Art Fleming, debuts

30 March

Jeopardy! is an American television game show created by Merv Griffin. The show features a quiz competition in which contestants are presented with general knowledge clues in the form of answers, and must phrase their responses in the form of questions. Continue reading “1964 – Jeopardy!, hosted by Art Fleming, debuts”

1856 – The Treaty of Paris is signed, ending the Crimean War

30 March

The Crimean War was a military conflict fought between October 1853 – February 1856 in which Russia lost to an alliance of France, the United Kingdom, the Ottoman Empire, and Sardinia. Continue reading “1856 – The Treaty of Paris is signed, ending the Crimean War”

Indigenous artefacts found at Sydney light rail construction site, calls to halt work 

There are calls for construction to stop on a section of Sydney’s new south-east light rail line after tens of thousands of Indigenous artefacts were discovered there. Continue reading “Indigenous artefacts found at Sydney light rail construction site, calls to halt work “

1939 – The Heinkel He 100 fighter sets a world airspeed record of 463 mph (745km/h)

30 March

The Heinkel He 100 was a German pre-World War II fighter aircraft design from Heinkel. Although it proved to be one of the fastest fighter aircraft in the world at the time of its development, the design was not ordered into series production. Approximately 19 prototypes and pre-production examples were built. None are known to have survived the war. Continue reading “1939 – The Heinkel He 100 fighter sets a world airspeed record of 463 mph (745km/h)”

Inscribed stele uncovered at Etruscan temple

Archaeologists in Italy have discovered what may be a rare sacred text in the Etruscan language that is likely to yield rich details about Etruscan worship of a god or goddess. Continue reading “Inscribed stele uncovered at Etruscan temple”

On this Day: Ragnar Lodbrok begins siege of Paris

On this day : March 29 AD 845 Ragnar Lodbrok having sailed by the river Seine with 120 ships carrying about 5,000 vikings began the siege of Paris. Continue reading “On this Day: Ragnar Lodbrok begins siege of Paris”

1973 – Operation Barrel Roll ends

29 March

Operation Barrel Roll was a covert U.S. Air Force 2nd Air Division (later the Seventh Air Force) and U.S. Navy Task Force 77, interdiction and close air support campaign conducted in the Kingdom of Laos between 14 December 1964 and 29 March 1973 concurrent with the Vietnam War. Continue reading “1973 – Operation Barrel Roll ends”

1911 – The M1911 .45 ACP pistol becomes the official U.S. Army side arm

29 March

The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated pistol chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge. It served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States Armed Forces from 1911 to 1986. Continue reading “1911 – The M1911 .45 ACP pistol becomes the official U.S. Army side arm”

Metallic ink revealed in Herculaneum papyri

An international team of scientists has discovered the presence of metal in the ink of two Herculaneum papyrus fragments proving that metals were used in ink several centuries earlier than previously believed. Continue reading “Metallic ink revealed in Herculaneum papyri”

Pharaoh Ramesses III killed by multiple assassins

 

The reign of Ramesses III, the second pharaoh in Egypt’s 20th dynasty, was not the most stable chapter in the empire’s history. There were endless wars with the “Sea Peoples”, which drained the treasury, bad weather that interrupted food supplies, along with political unrest. Continue reading “Pharaoh Ramesses III killed by multiple assassins”

1461 – Wars of the Roses: Battle of Towton

29 March

The Battle of Towton was fought during the English Wars of the Roses on this day in 1461, near the village of Towton in Yorkshire. It brought about a change of monarchs in England, with the victor, the Yorkist Edward, Duke of York—who became King Edward IV (1461–1483) having displaced the Lancastrian King Henry VI (1422–1461) as king, and thus drove the head of the Lancastrians and his key supporters out of the country. Continue reading “1461 – Wars of the Roses: Battle of Towton”

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