Search

History Bytez

Byte Sized bits of History

Month

January 2016

Illegal dumpsite found in Roman catacombs

The illegal dumping of rubbish in Roman catacombs along the Appian Way has been discovered by Italian police. Continue reading “Illegal dumpsite found in Roman catacombs”

Medieval mass burial found under UK car park

 

Archaeologists have discovered a mass grave containing 300 skeletons under ground being assessed for an affordable housing development. Continue reading “Medieval mass burial found under UK car park”

History of Hagia Sophia at Hellenic Cosmos VR ‘Tholos’ Theatre, Athens

The 1,500-year-old history of Hagia Sophia, an iconic world cultural heritage site and the most spectacular Orthodox cathedral in eastern Christendom for a millennium, is explored in a new 45-minute screening on show at the Hellenic Cosmos Culture Centre’s dome-shaped Virtual Reality Theatre, or ‘Tholos’, in Athens.

Source: The Archaeology News Network: History of Hagia Sophia at Hellenic Cosmos VR ‘Tholos’ Theatre, Athens

Statues depicting Artemis and Apollo found in Crete

Two small sized sculptures (approx 0.54cm height), one of Artemis made of copper and a second of her brother Apollo made of marble Have been found on Crete.

Continue reading “Statues depicting Artemis and Apollo found in Crete”

1939 – First flight of the Lockheed P-38 Lightning

27 January

The Lockheed P-38 Lightning was a World War II American propeller driven fighter aircraft. Developed to a United States Army Air Corps requirement, the P-38 had distinctive twin booms and a single, central nacelle containing the cockpit and armament. The P-38 was used in a number of roles, including interception, dive bombing, level bombing, ground-attack, night fighting, photo reconnaissance, radar and visual pathfinding for bombers, and evacuation missions, and extensively as a long-range escort fighter when equipped with drop tanks under its wings. Continue reading “1939 – First flight of the Lockheed P-38 Lightning”

Ancient footprints found at Tucson road construction site

A worker excavating the planned site of a bridge and new interstate connection on the northwest side has unearthed a series of footprints, an archaeological find that is believed to date back more than 2,500 years. Continue reading “Ancient footprints found at Tucson road construction site”

AD 17 – Messalina, third wife of Emperor Claudius, is born

25 January

Valeria Messalina, (c. 17/20–48) married (as his third wife) the Roman Emperor Claudius. She was a paternal cousin of the Emperor Nero, a second-cousin of the Emperor Caligula, and a great-grandniece of the Emperor Augustus. A powerful and influential woman with a reputation for promiscuity, she allegedly conspired against her husband and was executed on the discovery of the plot. Her notorious reputation arguably results from political bias, but works of art and literature have perpetuated it into modern times.

1971 – Idi Amin leads a coup deposing Milton Obote and becomes Uganda’s president

25 January

Idi Amin Dada (c. 1923-28 – 16 August 2003) was the third President of Uganda, ruling from 1971 to 1979. Continue reading “1971 – Idi Amin leads a coup deposing Milton Obote and becomes Uganda’s president”

Staff charged over damage to Tutankhamen’s Mask

Eight museum employees are now facing charges over the botched restoration of the burial mask of Tutankhamun in Egypt.

This was announced on Saturday by Egyptian prosecutors who claimed that professional methods were violated by the staff members. Continue reading “Staff charged over damage to Tutankhamen’s Mask”

1787 – Shays’s Rebellion: The rebellion’s largest confrontation, outside the Springfield Armory

25 January

Shays Rebellion was an armed uprising in Massachusetts (mostly in and around Springfield) during 1786 and 1787. Revolutionary War veteran Daniel Shays led four thousand rebels (called Shaysites) in rising up against perceived economic injustices and suspension of civil rights by Massachusetts, and in a later attempt to capture the United States’ national weapons arsenal at the U.S. Armoury at Springfield. Continue reading “1787 – Shays’s Rebellion: The rebellion’s largest confrontation, outside the Springfield Armory”

1961 – Goldsboro B-52 crash

24 January

The 1961 Goldsboro B-52 crash was an accident that occurred in Goldsboro, North Carolina, on this day in 1961. A B-52 Stratofortress carrying two Mark 39 nuclear bombs broke up in mid-air, dropping its nuclear payload in the process. Continue reading “1961 – Goldsboro B-52 crash”

1984 – The first Apple Macintosh goes on sale

24 January

The Macintosh (branded as Mac since 1997) is a series of personal computers (PCs) designed, developed, and marketed by Apple Inc. Steve Jobs introduced the original Macintosh computer on this day in 1984. Continue reading “1984 – The first Apple Macintosh goes on sale”

1915 – World War One: the Battle of Dogger Bank

24 January

The Battle of Dogger Bank was a naval battle fought near the Dogger Bank in the North Sea on this day in 1915, during the First World War, between squadrons of the British Grand Fleet and the German High Seas Fleet. Continue reading “1915 – World War One: the Battle of Dogger Bank”

1570 – James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray, regent of Scotland, is assassinated by firearm

23 January

James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray (c. 1531 – 23 January 1570) was a member of the House of Stewart as the illegitimate son of King James V, and was Regent of Scotland for his half-nephew, the infant King James VI of Scotland, from 1567 until his assassination in 1570.  Continue reading “1570 – James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray, regent of Scotland, is assassinated by firearm”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑